Quick Write

What is the purpose of evaluating a monster?

Structure

Possible sample outline to follow:

  1. Introduction leading to an evaluative claim.
  2. Criteria of evaluation stated, and, if necessary, defended.
  3. Subject measured by first criterion + evidence
  4. Subject measured by second criterion + evidence
  5. Subject measured by additional criterion + evidence
  6. Conclusion

Second sample outline with criterion introduced one at a time:

  • Introduction leading to an evaluative claim.
  • First criterion of evaluation stated, and, if necessary, defended.
    • Subject measured by first criterion + evidence
  • Second criterion stated/defended
    • Subject measured by second criterion + evidence
  • Additional criteria stated/defended
    • Subject measured by additional criterion + evidence
  • Conclusion

Points to Consider

Definition: Explain and define the monster you are writing about.

Mission: Explain your mission early on. Hook us with a good reason to continue reading.

Background: How did the monster come to be?

Culture: How the monster represents culture?  What cultural use does the monster serve?

Theory: How does the monster theory help us understand the monster or society?

Focal Point: Evaluate a specific monster representation not all of the representations. Use the other ones to help evaluate the main one.

Compare and Contrast: Examine the differences. Compare the strengths and weaknesses.

Judgment: How dies the monster meet the criteria for evaluation?

Purpose: Most evaluations provide usable information and beneficial criticism. After studying the monster and reading your essay, we should have a better understanding of the monster.

Keep it Simple: Choose a simple or predictable structure, criteria, and grading/evaluation.

Monster Theory and Frankenstein

In small groups, look at the seven theories to see which apply to Frankenstein and his Monster.

Monster Theory

  1. Thesis I. The Monster’s Body Is a Cultural Body (4)
  2. Thesis II. The Monster Always Escapes (4)
  3. Thesis III. The Monster Is the Harbinger of Category Crisis (6)
  4. Thesis IV. The Monster Dwells at the Gates of Difference (7)
  5. Thesis V. The Monster Polices the Borders of the Possible (12)
  6. Thesis VI. Fear of the Monster Is Really a Kind of Desire (16)
  7. Thesis VII. The Monster Stands at the Threshold . . . of Becoming (20)

Monster Theory Class Notes

Thesis I. The Monster’s Body Is a Cultural Body

  • Each culture will produce their own monsters and their own versions of monsters. “The monstrous body is pure culture” (4).
  • The monsters is born as an embodiment of a certain cultural moment, a time, a feeling, and a place. A monster will always change because culture changes, our fears and beliefs are always changing (4).
  • The monster signifies something other than itself: it is a displacement, it inhabits the gap between when it was created and it is received, to be born again (4).